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Tactics - Negative campaigning can shield a bad record

By Daniel Greer | 2 years ago

An overly negative campaign usually indicates a candidate that can’t run on their record. Susan Todd running in the Republican Party primary for House District 97 is a good example.

Todd is an influential member of a group, the American Medical Association, that helped pass Obamacare. Todd also worked to elect a Democrat to Governor in 2002.

Susan Todd was President of American Medical Alliance, an advocacy arm of the AMA. The AMA backed Obamacare’s individual mandate then listed passage of the mandate as one of AMA’s 2011 accomplishments. Todd boasted of these accomplishments in an email inviting members to the 2011 AMA annual meeting in Chicago, an appropriate location.

In 2002 Todd worked to beat Rick Perry by supporting the campaign of Democrat Tony Sanchez. Todd was a member of a coalition called Republicans and Independents for Tony Sanchez.

Todd is a client of Bryan Eppstein, a consultant who runs moderate candidates against conservatives. Eppstein is working to protect a shrinking liberal clientele in the Texas legislature as our state realizes it’s leadership is more liberal than they pretend to be. Empower Texans recently reported that Eppstein client Todd Staples was considering an endorsement to a liberal challenging Jim Landtroop. The liberal challenger is another Eppstein client.

Currently state Rep. Byron Cook, another Eppstein client, is embroiled in a controversy surrounding destruction of public records. AgendaWise reported on his illegal practice of not keeping a calendar. Following the report Eppstein’s firm tried to shut down AgendaWise.com by giving false information to our domain registrar.

The Todd campaign has spent the first part of this campaign lashing out against rivals, a good distraction from her history of hurting conservatives.

We’ve added video of Susan Todd to our “On the Record” section.